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The Lioness Sings

posted by: January 29, 2013 - 8:15am

AlannaEstablished in 1988, The Margaret A. Edwards Award honors an author, as well as a specific body of his or her work, for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature. It recognizes an author's work in helping adolescents become aware of themselves and addressing questions about their role and importance in relationships, society, and in the world. The honor was awarded this year by the American Library Association to Tamora Pierce. On her website, Pierce explains her writing style, even as a young girl:

 

"I got hooked on fantasy, and then on science fiction, and both made their way into my stories. I tried to write the kind of thing I was reading, with one difference: the books I loved were missing teenaged girl warriors."

 

Pierce has been called a pioneer in feminist fantasy literature. Her books have been translated into German, Danish, Swedish, Hungarian and Japanese, beginning with Alanna: The First Adventure (in the Song of the Lioness series) in 1983. Fans and new readers alike can learn more about Pierce by visiting her blog Dare to be Stupid or by checking out her books. One final quote from the award-winning Pierce:

 

"Books are still the main yardstick by which I measure true wealth."


 
 

2013 Printz Award Announced

posted by: January 28, 2013 - 3:16pm

In DarknessThe Michael L. Printz Award honors the best book written for teens each year. This year’s awards were announced by the American Library Association this morning and the winner is In Darkness by Nick Lake, a fictional account of the 2010 earthquake that devastated Haiti. Shorty is a teenage gangster who is in the wrong place at the wrong time. All alone and buried alive under the ruins of a hospital, Shorty’s connection with reality waxes and wanes as he tries to survive until rescue comes. Lake is a children’s book editor and the author of the Blood Ninja series.     

 

Four Printz honor books were also named for this year. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz is the coming-of-age story of the unlikely friendship between two Mexican-American teens. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein is the plot-twisting tale of a British female pilot in World War II. Terry Pratchett takes readers on a fantastical wild romp through Victorian London with Dodger. Finally, The White Bicycle by Beverley Brenna follows the journey through the south of France of a young woman with Asperger’s Syndrome.

 

 

 

 

 

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the UniverseCode Name VerityDodgerThe White Bicycle


 
 

Caldecott Winners Revealed

posted by: January 28, 2013 - 2:36pm

 

This is Not my HatPicture book author and illustrator Jon Klassen, known for his wry illustrations rendered in a muted color palette, was honored today by the American Library Association with the Randolph Caldecott Medal for This is Not my Hat. The book follows a sly minnow who has purloined a hat from a much larger fish and is certain he will get away with his petty crime. The illustrations, however, tell a different story. The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the illustrator of “the most distinguished picture book for children.”

 

Five Caldecott Honor Books were also named, including Extra Yarn, another book illustrated by Klassen, written by Mac Barnett. Extra Yarn shows the power of one young girl to change her town through kindness and generosity. Rounding out the list are the boy-and-his-penguin tale One Cool Friend, written by Toni Buzzeo, and illustrated by David Small; Green, a meditation on the color, written and illustrated by Laura Vaccaro Seeger; the Twilight Zone-inspired Creepy Carrots!, written by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Peter Brown; and the lyrical bedtime story Sleep Like a Tiger, written by Mary Logue and illustrated by Pamela Zagarenski.

 

Extra YarnGreenCreepy Carrots!Sleep Like a TigerOne Cool Friend


 
 

Step Gently OutTitanic: Voices from the DisasterSplendors and GloomsThe most prestigious awards for children's literature will be announced by the American Library Association at the Midwinter meeting in Seattle next Monday. A longstanding tradition of fans of literature for young people is guessing which titles will receive these prizes, which guarantee a sort of immortality for the books. "Honor" books, or runners-up, will also be announced for each category. The Randolph Caldecott Medal goes to the illustrator of the most distinguished American picture book for children. The previous year has seen a bevy of potential, worthy titles for the Caldecott Medal, among them three books by Philip and Erin Stead (who won a Caldecott Medal in 2011). Philip has two strong candidates in two sweet animal stories, A Home for Bird and Bear Has a Story to Tell, while Erin's homage to the end of winter And Then It's Spring could be named. More strong possibilities are Green by Laura Vaccaro Seeger, which covers the many shades of the verdant world; Paul Zelinsky's wacky alphabet book Z Is For Moose; and Step Gently Out, featuring close-up pictures of the insect world taken by Rick Lieber. It could receive the first Caldecott Medal given for photography. These, and many others, could win the big prize or be recognized as an honor book, in a wide open field.

 

The John Newbery Award goes to the "most distinguished contribution to American literature for children". Last year also brought a number of worthy and likely candidates, including two recent medalists. Local author Laura Amy Schlitz is once again a front runner with Splendors and Glooms, a glimpse inside the world of puppetry, while Rebecca Stead could take a prize for the artful and concise Liar and Spy. Katherine Applegate's tale of a lonely, long-suffering gorilla, The One and Only Ivan, receives a lot of mentions, as does R.A. Palacio's popular (too popular?) Wonder, the story of a boy with a facial deformity. In a strong year for nonfiction, Philip Hoose's Moonbird: a Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95, Steve Sheinkin's Bomb: the Race to Build and Steal the World's Most Dangerous Weapon, Deborah Hopkinson's Titanic: Voices from the Disaster, and We've Got a Job: the 1963 Birmingham Children's March by Cynthia Levinson all have reasonable hopes to receive notice from the committee. Stay tuned until Monday at 11:00am ET, when the awards will be given live from Seattle. 


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Code Name VerityThe Mighty Miss MaloneI Have a DreamThe most prestigious awards for children's literature, and literature for teens, will be announced by the American Library Association at the Midwinter meeting in Seattle next Monday. A longstanding tradition of fans of literature for young people is guessing which titles will receive these prizes, which guarantee a sort of immortality for the books. "Honor" books, or runners-up, will also be announced for each category. One of these is the Michael L. Printz Award, given for literary excellence in the field of books published for teens aged 12-18. Some of the top contenders for the Printz Award include Elizabeth Wein's tour de force, Code Name Verity, a historical novel set in the World War II era; Ask the Passengers, by A.S. King, which infuses elements of magical realism into a story of a teen girl coming to terms with her sexuality; Steve Sheinkin's Bomb, an engrossing history of the development of the atomic bomb; and The Fault in Our Stars, John Green's popular novel about two teens with cancer forging a friendship and romance against difficult odds.

 

Another is the Coretta Scott King awards, given to African-American authors and illustrators for excellence in the field. Front runners for the author award include Newbery Award winner Christopher Paul Curtis' The Mighty Miss Malone, the Depression-era story of a 12-year-old girl's family facing tough times; Pinned, about the first girl on the school's wrestling team, by Sharon Flake; No Crystal Stair, by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, an autobiographical novel about a famous Harlem bookseller, and Brian F. Walker's look into the pros and cons of scholarship and diversity in Black Boy White School. Kadir Nelson, a previous Coretta Scott King award winner, is again a leading contender in the illustrator category for I Have a Dream, a rendition of Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech at the Lincoln Memorial; E.B. Lewis' haunting illustrations of passive bullying in Each Kindness; Shane W. Evans for We March, also about the March on Washington in 1963; and Fifty Cents and a Dream: Young Booker T. Washington, covering his journey to learn to read and eventually become a scientist, illustrated by Bryan Collier.


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The Show Must Go On

posted by: November 19, 2012 - 8:45am

The Round HouseBewildermentGoblin SecretsBehind the Beautiful Forevers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hurricane Sandy wrought substantial damage to the building housing the offices of the National Book Foundation in New York City. Despite this disruption, the Foundation, which is the presenter of the prestigious National Book Award prizes, held its awards dinner on November 14 and announced the winners in four different categories.

 

Native American Louise Erdrich won the top honor for Fiction with her book, The Round House. Taking place on a North Dakota reservation, The Round House is a sensitive coming of age story and an unflinching look at contemporary tribal life as well as a tangled legalese whodunit. This beautifully written selection was discussed earlier in Between the Covers, as was the winner in the Nonfiction category, Katherine Boo’s Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity. Boo, a journalist, stayed in one of Mumbai’s poorest slum communities for several years and carefully chronicled the stories of the people and families living as the have-nots in a city acknowledged to be the wealthiest in India.

 

National Book awards are also presented for Young People’s Literature, won by William Alexander for his tale, Goblin Secrets, and its Poetry prize was bestowed upon David Ferry for his volume entitled Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations. As indicated by the eponymous title, eighty-eight year old Ferry includes both his original poems as well as his translations of other works which support the themes of his verses. Goblin Secrets is described by Kirkus Reviews as a mix of “steampunk and witchy magic” and features Rownie, a boy searching for his missing older brother in the city of Zombay. Opening with a witch who needs her clockwork chicken legs wound up with a crank so she can walk, Ferry has crafted a unique debut novel.

 


 
 

National Book Award nominees

posted by: October 11, 2012 - 11:20am

EndangeredOut of reachNever Fall DownFinalists for the 2012 National Book Awards were announced yesterday. In the category of Young People’s Literature, three teen novels earned nominations. All three center around conflict and struggle, sometimes due to outside forces and sometimes from within.

 

Endangered by Eliot Schrefer examines the complexities of parent-child relationships with a unique twist. Sophie does not understand her mother’s dedication to the bonobos of the Congo, and she resents her life of forced compliance. When the sanctuary is attacked by armed revolutionaries, they must flee into the jungle with the apes. Sophie finds herself a surrogate mother to an infant bonobo named Otto, and she understands for the first time the worries of being a parent as they struggle to survive. View the author’s introduction to Endangered as well as footage from his trip to the Congo.

 

Family strife also figures prominently in Out of Reach, the lyrical debut by Carrie Arcos. Rachel’s idol has always been her big brother Micah; however, there is a darkness in him that threatens to engulf them both. Micah is a drug addict, albeit a “high-functioning” one, and he has always been able to control himself long enough to win the battle with his addiction. When he fails to come home one night, Rachel blames herself. As she searches for Micah, her own inner darkness rises to the surface and the lies that have woven through the fabric of their family begin to unravel. View the emotional book trailer.

 

Patricia McCormick earns her second National Book Award nomination with Never Fall Down, a novel based on the true story of a young survivor of the Cambodian Killing Fields. Read the previous Between the Covers review.

 


 
 

Across the Pond Contenders

posted by: September 13, 2012 - 8:30am

Bring Up the BodiesThe Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold FrySkiosWhat do Skios by Michael Frayn, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce, and Hilary Mantel’s Bring Up the Bodies have in common? Each has been included on the Long List of Great Britain’s highly coveted contemporary fiction award, the Man Booker Prize.

 

Taking place on the private Greek island of Skios, blonde Nikki Hook is the coolly capable public relations rep for the prestigious Fred Toppler foundation. She is preparing for the arrival of, and fantasizing about, much vaunted guest speaker Dr. Norman Wilfred. Nikki’s gal pal Georgie is heading to a secretive tryst at the other end of the island with dilettante playboy Oscar Fox. Lost luggage, mistaken identity, wrong rooms, taxi-driving brothers, and a language barrier all figure prominently in this farce, both comedic and satirical. Euphoksoliva, anyone?

 

Hobby-less Harold is recently retired. Seemingly estranged from his only son, on the very last nerve of his house-cleaning wife, and locked in desultory lawn care chats with his recently widowed neighbor, Harold needs a purpose. Purpose arrives via the mail in the guise of a brief letter from former co-worker Queenie Hennessy, who writes to let Harold know she is dying. Harold responds with a quick condolence note but instead decides that if he walks to see Queenie himself, she will survive. Marching along in yacht shoes and a neck tie, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry has Mr. Fry walking five hundred miles through England as he develops both blisters and perspective in this charming yet poignant tale.

 

Bring Up the Bodies is the sequel to Hilary Mantel’s 2009 winner of the Booker Prize, Wolf Hall, and again features Thomas Cromwell. Now a powerful minister to Henry VIII, Cromwell’s job is to clear out Anne Boleyn as Henry yearns to replace her with Jane Seymour. Written using present tense, the author offers a fresh view on Cromwell as a thoughtful reformer carrying out the wishes of the King. Mantel’s skill in writing fascinating and suspenseful historical fiction is on display here, drawing in the reader despite the foregone conclusion. Mantel plans a third book which will complete the Thomas Cromwell trilogy.

 


 
 

Happy 20th Anniversary, Junie B. Jones!

posted by: May 30, 2012 - 5:11am

Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly BusJunie B. First Grader: Turkeys We Have Loved and EatenTwenty years ago, Random House approached 3 of their established authors to begin a new line of books for new readers who were just starting to read chapter books.  Those authors were Barbara Park, Mary Pope Osborne, and Louis Sachar. The series that the authors created were Junie B. Jones, The Magic Tree House, and Marvin Redpost, all of which are now standards for young readers and have sold millions of copies. 

 

In the beginning, Park had reservations about writing for 6-9 year olds, but she decided to give it a shot and began work on the Junie B. Jones series. Park says, “Within the first four sentences, I discovered I had a character who hated her middle name. By the second page, I knew she was a wild child, who – big surprise – had not yet mastered the Queen’s English. And when I finally finished the book, I thought maybe I could write one or two more. I was a little low with my expectations, apparently.” Her expectations were definitely too low. There are now 29 books in the Junie B. Jones series, and more than 52 million copies in print! 

 

To celebrate 20 years of Junie B. Jones, Random House has published a special edition of the first novel in the series, Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus. This commemorative edition has some great extras including full-color illustrations and an interview of the author conducted by none other than Junie B. Also, look for Junie B.’s next big adventure Junie B., First Grader: Turkeys We Have Loved and Eaten (and Other Thankful Stuff), a Thanksgiving-themed book due out this August!


 
 

Fiction Award Nominees

posted by: May 21, 2012 - 5:01am

Lost Memory of SkinThe Forgotten WaltzSwamplandia!The nominees for the inaugural Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction were recently announced.  This award recognizes books written for adults that were published in the U.S. in the previous year.   The three finalists deal with varied and unique topics, but each has a strong emotional current running throughout.

 

In Lost Memory of Skin, Russell Banks turns a magnifying glass toward the outcasts of society.  A “community” of convicted sex offenders has sprung up on a causeway at the edge of the city limits in South Florida.  These men are caught in the grey area of the legal system; they cannot reside within 2500 feet of any gathering place for children but they must live within the city according to the conditions of their parole.  Never one to shy away from the morally complex, Banks presents these men sympathetically and challenges the reader to reexamine his/her own moral code.  Lost Memory of Skin was a 2012 Pen/Faulkner Award finalist. 

 

Sparsely written and often surprising, The Forgotten Waltz is a novel set in Ireland that deals with the emotional taboo of extramarital affairs.  A chance meeting leads Gina and Sean into a passionate affair that takes years to arrive at a crescendo. Booker Prize winner Anne Enright takes an unapologetic look at love, marriage, infidelity and secrets.  Enright’s writing is non-linear and poetic.  Musical metaphors abound in the witty dance that is The Forgotten Waltz, which was shortlisted for the 2012 Orange Prize.

 

Swamplandia! by debut author Karen Russell is the story of Ava Bigtree, a thirteen-year-old alligator wrestler at her family’s animal park in the Florida Everglades.  The struggle to save the park after the death of her mother rests squarely on Ava’s shoulders, as the other members of the family withdraw to battle their own personal demons.  Whimsical, beautiful language anchors this magical tale to a place somewhere between imagination and reality.  Swamplandia! was a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.


 
 

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